As the early settlers moved westward, vast areas of Iowa were explored.
The gently rolling hills, fertile valleys and miles of prairie with its rivers and
streams, seemed like the ideal place to homestead. When the treaty with
the Sac and Fox Indians was signed in 1842, this became a reality.

Redfield is one of the oldest towns in Dallas County. It was originally named
New Ireland by the Cavanaugh brothers.
The town of Wiscotta was laid out by Col. James Redfield about one mile
south and efforts were made to establish both towns with Wiscotta being
the larger for some time. New Ireland was purchased by Col. Redfield and
the name was changed to honor him.

About 1864, Redfield finally won the battle and soon a narrow gauge
railroad came by popular subscription. Col. Redfield was killed in Georgia
with Sherman in his march to the sea. A bronze plaque in the northeast
corner of the park honors Co. H 39th Volunteers Infantry which was
mustered at that location.

Early on, an organization was formed so that "Old pioneers might meet and
talk of by-gone days" thus forming the Old Settlers Celebration, which is still
a summer tradition although it has changed greatly from its beginnings.
Hanging Rock is one of God's wonders on the Middle Raccoon River. Just
downstream is where immigrants, Mormons and 49'ers forded the river
going ever westward.

The Redfield area was also an original stop on the Underground Railroad.
Numerous coal beds and water power was utilized by the early settlers.
Due to the excellent clay found in this area Redfield was the town with "Two
Brick Yards". Only one now remains in operation being greatly modernized.
The rich clay deposits were also utilized by Midland Int'l Tileworks, a
ceramic tile manufacturer that once sold tile all over the United States.
Unfortunately, that business is now closed.
.
Redfield celebrated its 145th anniversary in 2005. Today still finds a clinic,
school, churches, library and necessary businesses in service. The
Raccoon River Bike Trail goes through town and many people are seeing
our natural wonders for the first time. Redfield has room to grow and looks
forward to the opportunity.
Col. James Redfield